What Is A Fibroid In The Uterus

What are the Causes of Breast Fibroids?

Author: james sameul

Breast fibroids, also known as fibrocystic breast disease, fibroid breasts, mammary dysplasia, benign breast disease and diffuse cystic mastopathy, are benign (non-cancerous), moveable, rubbery nodules that cause painful swelling near the breast surface.

GEL INJECTION APPARATUS AND TREATMENT OF BREAST, FIBROIDS AND ENDOMETRIAL ABLATION
An injection apparatus for treatment of diseases associated with female reproductive organs, comprising: a hollow core needle with a distal tip; an access probe configured to provide access to a uterus cavity by way of a vaginal canal; a lumen in the access probe for guiding said needle, the access probe adapted for directing the distal tip to a tissue area of interest selected from the group consisting of uterus, fibroid, myoma, fallopian tube, ovary, and cervix; and an injector for delivering a treatment substance comprising an active treatment substance and an inactive binding substance through the needle to the tissue area of interest.

Breast Cancer Drug Effective for Fibroids in Women

In premenopausal women with fibroids, the breast cancer drug anastrozole (Arimidex) reduces fibroid size and improves bothersome symptoms, according to results of a prospective study conducted at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece.
Fibroid tumors, or uterine leiomyomata, are benign growths in the uterus that can cause pain and bleeding and may eventually require surgical removal.

Based on other studies, the researchers think long-term treatment with anastrozole will be safe, but they emphasize that larger, placebo-controlled clinical trials will be required to establish the risk posed by prolonged anastrazole use in premenopausal women.

Anastrozole is typically prescribed for older (postmenopausal) women with breast cancer that is sensitive to estrogen. Anastrozole, and similar drugs, inhibit the enzyme aromatase, which is needed to produce estrogen. The current study suggests that anastrozole, given in such a low dose, acts primarily by blocking estrogens produced by the fibroids.

What are the Causes of Breast Fibroids?
The causes of breast fibroids are not completely understood. However, there are several factors that play a significant role in the development of the disease.

·    The monthly changes in the levels of oestrogen and progesterone are considered to be the most noteworthy factors contributing to this disease. These two hormones directly affect the breast tissues by causing cells to grow and multiply.
·    Prolactin, growth factor, thyroid hormone and insulin also influence the development of breast fibroids.
·    The breast produces hormonal products from its glandular and fat cells. These hormonal products send signals to the neighbouring breast cells. These signals are the key factors responsible for the development of breast fibroids.

Difference between benign breast lumps and cancerous ones

Uterine fibroids (singular Uterine Fibroma) (leiomyomata, singular leiomyoma) are benign tumors which grow from the muscle layers of the uterus.Fibroids are named according to where they are found. They are the most common benign neoplasm in females, and may affect about 25% of white and 50% of black women during the reproductive years. Uterine fibroids shrink dramatically in size after a woman passes through menopause. Cervical fibroids are found in the wall of the womb and can become very large.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/what-are-the-causes-of-breast-fibroids-438991.html

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10 Responses to What Is A Fibroid In The Uterus

  1. jessica says:

    What is a fibroid? I went to the er cause i was having a lot of pain & they told me i had one in my uterus?
    The paper they gave me said i have a (masslike lesion) along my endomertium and a fibroid inmy uterus. Im going to the doctors right now to see whats going on but does anyone know some who has this too? im so confused.

    • jessica m says:

      What are fibroids?

      Fibroids are muscular tumors that grow in the wall of the uterus (womb). Another medical term for fibroids is “leiomyoma” (leye-oh-meye-OH-muh) or just “myoma”. Fibroids are almost always benign (not cancerous). Fibroids can grow as a single tumor, or there can be many of them in the uterus. They can be as small as an apple seed or as big as a grapefruit. In unusual cases they can become very large.

      Why should women know about fibroids?

      About 20 percent to 80 percent of women develop fibroids by the time they reach age 50. Fibroids are most common in women in their 40s and early 50s. Not all women with fibroids have symptoms. Women who do have symptoms often find fibroids hard to live with. Some have pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids also can put pressure on the bladder, causing frequent urination, or the rectum, causing rectal pressure. Should the fibroids get very large, they can cause the abdomen (stomach area) to enlarge, making a woman look pregnant.

      Can fibroids turn into cancer?

      Fibroids are almost always benign (not cancerous). Rarely (less than one in 1,000) a cancerous fibroid will occur. This is called leiomyosarcoma (leye-oh-meye-oh-sar-KOH-muh). Doctors think that these cancers do not arise from an already-existing fibroid. Having fibroids does not increase the risk of developing a cancerous fibroid. Having fibroids also does not increase a woman’s chances of getting other forms of cancer in the uterus.

  2. Priya says:

    Can hbsag positive person can get operated for fibroid in uterus?
    ya sure …. My friend’s mom has a fibroid in utreus .. Doctor has adviced that It has to be operated like wise she was admitted in hospital and went through all tesitings and all report has come normal , HIV as negative but only HBSAG has come has positive . so doctor told that operation cant be done when HBSAG is positive . now what can be done for this problem , what is the solution, is that hbsag positive can be cured if its so what will be the medicine can anybody help me in this please …….

    • monika J says:

      Normally if disease is in acute stage surgeon will not operate there is a fear of hepatic failure
      if disease is chronic and SGPT is below 70 then there is no problem in the operation of HBSAG positive patients

  3. rosalinda says:

    I have a fibroid in my uterus and I’m 9 weeks pregnant… should i be worried?
    I’m not sure if the fibroid is in my uterus or just outside of it. As anyone every been pregnant with a fibroid in their uterus? I’m worried about it and don’t know what to do. Are there things that i shouldn’t be doing with the fibroid in my uterus while I’m pregnant? Plz help… thanks

    • chie says:

      is your fibroid malignant or benign?

      if it is malignant, you should ask your doctor about it, and discuss if you need to start taking meds, which would be hazardous to the pregnancy.

      if it is benign, it would depend upon the size and location. if it is too big and inside the uterus, it might take a lot of space – space which is intended for the growth and development of the fetus.

      i had myoma while i was pregnant and yet my baby was born healthy.

  4. Claudia says:

    I really need your help and suggestions, So here I am 9 days later after visiting the physical therapist?
    I am so tired of feeling this pain. I finally had an MRI done and here are the results;
    Vertebral alignment: Normal.
    Marrow signal: Normal.
    Vertebral height: Normal.
    Disc space height: Disc desiccation of the L3/4, L4/5 and L5/S1 discs.
    Conus: Normal in position and signal.
    Mild heterogeneity of the uterus probably representing a fibroid uterus.
    Findings at individual levels are as follows:
    L1-2: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L2-3: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L3-4: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L4-5: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L5-S1: Minimal broad-based disc bulge. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    CONCLUSION:
    Multilevel disk desiccation changes and minimal broad-based disc bulge at
    the L5/S1 level otherwise negative lumbar MRI.
    Now I have done some research and have read how to deal with a pinched nerve/sciatica…and everything says that ice, motrin, and rest should alleviate the pain, well to be honest that does not pertain to me. My pain is so severe that is wakes me up at night. I was on tylenol #4, ibuprofen 800mg and flexeril, but it did nothing for the pain and muscle spasms. I am now on percocet and valium. This does help, however it makes me sooooo sleepy. I get up and walk around and do my best to be active but I walk slouching over, I cannot twist, I used my left leg to carry most of my weight, and when i use the restroom I can only use my left hand to wipe…I am just tired!!! when will i get better. what can i do, and please dont tell me the motrin will do it cause if you could just be in my shoes for just an hour you would know the pain that I am in and it SUCKS!!!!
    some backround——
    i am an active 34 yr old woman, slender
    I am in martial arts/cardio
    I run a mile a day
    I am overall an active woman
    How long will this take to heal and based on the findings of the MRI, do you feel that the fibroid may have anything to do with this??????
    *note* this all started by the PT pulling my neck in an upward motion, and the pain was felt in my lower back.
    IF YOU HAVE SUFFERED FROM THIS, WHAT DID YOU DO TO GET BETTER AND HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE BEFORE I CAN WALK NORMALLY?????????!!!!
    THANK YOU SO MUCH!

    • mistify says:

      Some of the things that techman suggested are common recommendations in PT. I agree with most of what he is saying, there is nothing major to suggest such severe symptoms, nor is their anything to suggest that the distraction test done by the therapist did anything mechanical to injure the spine. In fact, based on the MRI, I would expect that pulling on the neck (or possibly the legs), would have actually made you feel BETTER…however, MRI and pain frequently do not correlate.

      The exercise Techman recommended is helpful for MANY people who have sciatic type symptoms. However, I will make the stipulation, that while it’s helpful for most, it can actually make some people worse, It’s a common exercise recommended by PT who practice the “McKenzie Method”. That being said, it may be worth it to see a PT who is certified or diplomaed in the method (www.mckenziemdt.org).

      Disc dessication is a normal phenomenon that occurs in everyone.

      Fibroids could be a source of back pain, but you do not give enough history to clarify whether this may be a mechanical or medical problem. If your pain is affected by certain movements and positions, then it’s more likely to be mechanical, if it’s not affected by change in movement or position, I would have the fibroid investigated further.

      As far as healing, it all depends on the source/type of back pain you have…which doesn’t appear that clear yet. If you see the PT who is certified in the McKenzie method and you are found to be classified as someone who has a “reducible derangement”, you will most likely feel significantly better in two weeks with the treatment.

      If your pain is really medical in nature, its difficult to say what the course of symptoms will bring.

  5. Claudia says:

    Please HELP me understand my MRI. Are the finding severe? I have my appt next week with my GP, but the?
    anticipation is making me anxious. If you know what the finding mean, please explain. I will be giving the 10 points. THANK YOU!

    MR images of the lumbar spine were obtained.
    Sagittal T1-weighted. Sagittal FSE T2-weighted. Sagittal STIR. Axial
    T1-weighted. Axial FSE T2-weighted.
    FINDINGS:
    Vertebral alignment: Normal.
    Marrow signal: Normal.
    Vertebral height: Normal.
    Disc space height: Disc desiccation of the L3/4, L4/5 and L5/S1 discs.
    Conus: Normal in position and signal.
    Mild heterogeneity of the uterus probably representing a fibroid uterus.
    Findings at individual levels are as follows:
    L1-2: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L2-3: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L3-4: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L4-5: No disc protrusion or extrusion. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    L5-S1: Minimal broad-based disc bulge. No spinal stenosis. No neural
    foraminal stenosis.
    CONCLUSION:
    Multilevel disk desiccation changes and minimal broad-based disc bulge at
    the L5/S1 level otherwise negative lumbar MRI.
    2 hours ago – 4 days left to answer.
    PLEASE NOTE*********
    I have severe pain and the only thing that helps me alleviate the pain is perocet, which i hate taking, but it the only thing that allows me to somewhat walk, and sleep. So the MRI says its normal but why do I feel like crap!!! The pain shoots down my leg and it feels like it weighs 100 pounds, BACK and HIP pain is excruiating.. Overall I am healthy, active, normal weight,. I went to the PT and after he pulled my neck in an upward motion BAM*&^%#?! my back started killing me…..
    SO another question… if my MRI is normal why DO I Feel this WAY????
    pain level is at a 9 out of 10

    • bryson77 says:

      In a nut shell and plain English, the MRI picked up some formation on your uterus, possibly a fibroid, keep an eye on that. Foraminal Stenosis are the little holes in your vertebrae where the nerve roots (Wires) run through. Over time these will narrow thus creating pressure on the nerve roots. When these openings narrow they place pressure on the nerves creating pain. Spinal Stenosis is the narrowing of space around the spinal cord. Both of these, look fine. So L1 thru L4-5 disks are in good condition. Now L5-S1 disk seems to have a Herniation in which they are calling it a bulge. You indicated that you are taking Percocet. This medication blocks the pain signals from reaching to your brain, which indicates to me that this is a nerve issue, if the pain is relieved somewhat after you take this medication. The L-5 ,S1 disk is where the sciatic nerve (main Nerve) branches off from your spinal cord going down both legs. This bulge is probably pressing against this nerve causing you pain (burning like sensation) in the butt, and down your leg. This is where your problem probably is. This is called sciatica. Usually the Dr reading the MRI will state in mm how large the bulge is, but not here. Overtime, becaus

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